NORFOLK PUBLIC HOUSES norfolkpubs.co.uk
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DUKE OF WELLINGTON EMNETH Index
ELM BRIDGE ROAD
WEST MEADOW GATE
FREEBRIDGE-MARSHLAND FULL LICENCE -
BEERHOUSE from c1890?
CLOSED c1912
ELGOOD & SONS
Licensees :
JOHN MAYHEW
age 40 in 1861, 47 in 1871 & 60 in 1881
1861 - 1883
WILLIAM GOODSON
(farm labourer 1891)
age 56 in 1891
1888 - 1896
ROBERT HALL
Age 45 in 1901
* 1900 - * 1904
CHARLES COKER
Age 45 in 1911
& market gardener
* 1908 - 1911
HARRY JAMES HARDY October 1911 - 1912


The house sold 33 barrels of beer each year from 1909 to 1912. 198 dozen bottles (per year) of beer had been sold over the same period.
Licensee Hardy had been at the house since October 1911 and had sold 16.5 barrels of beer and 4 to 6 dozen bottles of beer in the period from 11th October to Christmas 1911.


West Meadow Gate 1861
Elm Road 1881
Elm Bridge Road 1891

Stood to the North of the Blacksmiths Arms
on the opposite side of the road.
Demolished.

Not identified by name, in directories, after 1891

At the Petty sessions 5th February 1912 the licence renewal was withheld on the grounds of redundancy, but would be open to argument at the 4th March licensing meeting.

At the March 1912 licensing sessions it was said that the house had been inspected by Superintendant Bentham. The rooms, with the exception of the bar parlour and the tap-room, were small. The house was not in good repair. The nearest house was the Blacksmith's Arms, 60 yards away. The Prince of Wales was a mile away. The house was close to the light railway line and was considered a danger. The Superintendant considered that one house was sufficient for the neighbourhood. It was pointed out that there was a doubling in population during May to the middle of August owing to the arrival of fruit pickers. During the summer the house took in 9 lodgers and some of the Sheffield Anglers stayed there. The house could be improved at small expense and it was already in a better condition than it was a year or so ago. The Superintendant said that the house was easy to supervise and although he had no cause for complaint against the tenants, the lodgers had caused so much trouble that extra police officers were required to supervise the area. The class of lodger attracted to the house and area, was the problem.

A report in the Lynn Advertiser of 8th March 1912 said that Superintendant Powles considered the house to be in a fairly good state of repair. He related that the population of Emneth was 960 in 1901 and with 7 public houses in the area it made one house for every 137 people. He confirmed that the tram metals were no more than 12 feet from the front door and he considered those using the house were subject to an element of danger. It was confirmed that there was no protection between the train line and the public house door. He had not heard of any accident.

The licence was referred for compensation and a provisional licence granted.

Closure opposed at Licensing Authority meeting Friday 21st June 1912. It was said that the population of the district was increasing, and Mr Elgood confirmed an increased trade. The tenant said that he had ten lodgers at the house who had to sleep two to a bed. Those in favour of closure argued that the house was not needed in the neighbourhood and Sergeant Powles did not consider a licence was required at this particular location.
House referred for compensation.

Licensee name confirmed as Harry James Hardy and Registered Owner as Elgood & Son when licence refusal by reason of closure by Compensation, published 23rd August 1912.