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THREE HORSE SHOES GISSING Index
LONG ROW DISS HUNDRED FULL LICENCE CLOSED August 1961
DISS HUNDRED REGISTERS taken 18th September 1789 & 19th September 1794 & DISS LICENCE REGISTER PS 16/5/112 ( 1928 - 1969 )
YOUNGS, CRAWSHAY & YOUNGS Freehold sold by YCY Partnership to YCY Company 27.11.1897 for completion 01.02.1898
BULLARDS  
Licensees :
-
-  
THOMAS BOND 1789 - 1794
-  
-  
HENRY NEWBY
( Died Q4 1866 - age 87 )
1836
EDWARD TURNER 1845 - 1846
WILLIAM BETTS
age 46
& dealer
* 1851 - 1854
SAMUEL MUSK 1856 - 1858
WILLIAM HARVEY
Age 40 in 1861
* 1861 - 1863
JAMES GOODRUM
(Gooderham 1871)
Died Q3 1871 - age 56
1864 - 1871
Mrs HARRIET GOODRUM
( Mrs H Goodwin 1877 )
1872 - 1879
Mrs ELIZABETH GOODRUM
(Gooderham 1890)
Died Q2 1891 - age 75
1881 - 1891
GEORGE WEBSDELL
( Died Q1 1906 - age 75 )
1892 - 1897
GEORGE TURNER
& thrashing machine
( Died March 1933 - age 66 )
1900 - 1902
WALTER WILLIAM MURTON 22.10.1902 to 1905
DANIEL W CULLING
See opposite
11.10.1905 - 1907
EDGAR FENTON
Age 39
( Died December 1934 - age 73 )
1911
HARRY LAST 1912 - 1922
THOMAS LEWIS MULLENGER ALGAR
Died December 1949 - age 70
by 1925 to 1949
ALICE MAUD ALGAR
( Died December 1970 - age 88 )
12.01.1950
FREDERICK GILBERT WHIFFEN 06.04.1950
LESLIE WALTER GEORGE CHAMBERLAIN
( Died September 2005 - age 92 )
10.01.1952
Mr. E. S. C. GROOM 20.10.1955
ALBERT EDWARD FINN
( Died March 1992 - age 88 )
by 1958
to closure?


 
 On Tuesday 19th December 1911 Ralph Vaughan Williams, who was visiting the area collecting traditional songs, heard "Lancashire Farmer", singer unknown, then Isaac or Ephraim Woods sang "Key of My Heart" and William Tufts junior performed "Miller and Three Sons" and "Old King Cole".

On Wednesday 20th December 1911, Noah Fisher sang "Harvest Song", "Hares in the Plantation", "Team Boy" and "Barley Mow", whilst `Blue' Fisher gave renditions of Bonny Robin and Jockey to the Fair ( Words of the latter then deemed unsuitable for publication).

On Thursday 21st December 1911 landlord Harry Last sang "Sweet Primrose"

(Information thanks to the researches of Alan Helsdon 2017)
 



Included in September 1789 Diss Hundred Register as the HORSESHOES

Shown on Bryants 1826 map

Licence not renewed at the Diss Brewster Sessions held Tuesday 14th February 1906. Future of the licence to be determined at the Adjourned licensing Meeting to be held on Tuesday 6th March 1906.

At the adjourned meeting held Wednesday 14th March 1906 Police-sergeant Green formally objected to the licence renewal. He said that the house was 2396 yards away from the RAILWAY TAVERN, Tivetshall and 2664 yards from Gissing CHEQUERS and 96 yards away from the highway. With a population of 341 that gave one house to every 113 of the population. The house was hard to supervise and there was no evidence of many waggons or carts travelling along the track to the house.
Trade was reported to be 79 barrels and 103 dozen bottles of beer, also 23 gallons of spirits. The Reverend Cooper said that it was in the interests of the parish that the licence be granted. Superintendant Southgate thought it was the CHEQUERS that should close not this house.
Hearing that the house was frequented by waggoners who travelled to Tivetshall Station, who did not care to put up their horses so close to the railway line as would be the case at the RAILWAY TAVERN and since it was useful to those in the immediate area and not 1½ mile away, the Bench decided to renew the licence.


~

Daniel Culling was charged on the 9th October 1907 of having sold beer, in a greater quantity of a reputed pint and not in a sealed vessel,  to a person under 14 years, on the 21st September 1907.
Police constable Page had observed a nine year old lad named Wicks proceeding from the house towards Tibenham carrying two half-gallon bottles which were not sealed.
Mrs. Culling admitted that they often sold beer to children, but always in sealed bottles, this case was an oversight. Mr. Culling said he was not at home at the time of the offence and this was the only complaint against him in the years that he had been at the house.
The Bench considered that the police had acted correctly in bringing the matter to them, but it struck them as a matter of trivial indifference and not intentional.
Mr. Culling was cautioned to ensure the event did not reoccur and the case was dismissed.