NORFOLK PUBLIC HOUSES norfolkpubs.co.uk
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DOGGER WELLS next the Sea Index
FREEMAN STREET
DOGGER LANE
NORTH GREENHOE HUNDRED   CLOSED c1891
NORTH GREENHOE REGISTERS September 1789 & 10th September 1794
RUSTS to 1861
ELIJAH EYRES  
BULLARDS Leased for 10 years from 6th April 1878
Licensees :
-
HENRY WOODS 1789 - 1794
-  
-  
EDMUND THOMPSON
(Died 1803)
to 1803
JOHN PENNINGTON 1805
HENRY FOX
(Carpenters Arms)
1813
VALENTINE PIGGE 1822
JOSEPH LOWN 1830 - 1839
GEORGE HUMPHREY
Age 40 in 1841
1841 - 1845
MINDHAM EDWARDS 1846
JOHN RIX
age 43 in 1851
1850 - 1854
GEORGE HARMAN
(Beerhouse in Dogger Lane)
*1856
RICHARD LANGLEY
(b 1830 - d 1904)
(Richard Langley junior 1863)
*1858 - 1864
Fined 9th April 1864 for selling out of licensed hours on Good Friday 25th March.
Licence renewal refused 5th September 1864 due to manner of running house.
RICHARD LANGLEY junior 1864 - 1870
Fine of 9s 6d on Monday 4th February 1867 for having unjust earthenware measures on the premises.
DOWNING SAMPHER 1875 - 1879
JOHN SHEARING
general labourer
1881 - 1883
WILLIAM T. KING 1890
MARY LOYNES *1891


A licence to Edward Julian was issued in 1673 to premises believed to be on this site.

The will of Elizabeth Loads, dated 16th June 1780, left the house, known by the sign of the Dogger, to Austin Dennis, son of Valentine Dennis. This is earliest record yet found describing the house as licensed premises.

Named the DOGGER in 1789 & 1795
In a will dated 1803 Edmund Thompson, Public House Keeper, left his estate and property including the Dogger to his wife.
In 1813 the house is identified as the CARPENTERS ARMS.

As the Dagger 1836.

~

The Norfolk News of 29th June 1861 carried details of the forthcoming auction, Tuesday July 16th 1861, of :-
Lot 1 THE BREWERY occupied by Mrs Rust.
and including the FAMILY HOUSE, licensed by the Magistrates and known as the BREWERS ARMS.

Lots 2, 3 and 10 were garden and land.

Lot 6 was the DOGGER, situate on the Holkham Road, and occupied by Richard Langley.

Lots 4, 5, 7, 8 & 9 were other public houses in Wells, Wighton and Hindringham.

~

Norfolk Chronicle - Saturday 09 April 1864 - Walsingham Petty Sessions - Monday 4th.
Richard Langley,
of Wells, publican, was charged by police-sergeant Provart with drawing beer out of licensed hours on the 25th ult. (Good Friday). The police visited the house, the Dogger Inn, Wells, a quarter before one on Friday morning, and found three men drinking. The defendant pleaded ignorance, but the bench considered that he had been too long in the trade for that plea to avail, and fined him (with costs) 15s.

~

The licence was refused at the North Greenhoe Licensing Sessions Monday 5th September 1864.
The date of a licence being granted after that date yet to be confirmed.

~

In 1870, Hannah Langley, wife of licensee Richard Langley was accused of theft of a receipt.

It was reported in the Lynn Advertiser of 22nd October 1870 that Hanna Langley was on bail, accused of stealing a receipt for money, with a one penny stamp attached.
Mr R Carpenter collected money for Charles Miller and Elijah Eyre and on 5th September had been paid £8 10s towards a bill of £9. Upon being given a receipt for that sum, it was claimed that Mrs Langley had said that she would be able to pay a further £21 18s 2d of another outstanding debt, if Mr Carpenter was prepared to take the odd 18s 2d off.
Mr Carpenter agreed and wrote out a receipt accordingly.
She then took the two receipts and left the room, apparently with the intention of collecting the outstanding money. However when she returned she only gave him the £8 10s and refused to return the receipt for £21.
The police were informed but apparently entry to the house could not be made that night because the house was closed. Mr Carpenter visited the house the following day, with a friend and had drunk a glass of porter. His intention was he claimed, to retrieve the receipt, but this was again refused. In court Mrs Langley claimed that the debt had been paid and that Carpenter had made a mistake in the matter and that he had been up to such tricks before.
The jury sided with Mr Carpenter and Mrs Langley was sentenced to serve 2 months hard labour at Wymondham Bridewell.

In the Lynn Advertiser of 29th October 1870 it was reported that Mrs Langley was serving her term of imprisonment and that the courts were making Mr Richard Langley responsible to the plaintiffs (Miller & Co) for payment of the` full sum claimed with costs, and leave to issue immediate execution and the right to take whatever steps they were advised in reference to the defendant.'

In 1871 Richard Langley (40) is listed as working as a labourer,
living in Church Street with his wife Hannah M (34)

By 1888 he is a licensee again at the WAGGON & HORSES



Location given as West End 1879 and as on Holkham Road in 1887.