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BANK PLAIN RESTAURANT NORWICH B index
5 BANK PLAIN    later
1 QUEEN STREET
St. GEORGE TOMBLAND - See GUNDRY WHITES
NORWICH LICENCE REGISTERS PS 1/8/1 - 1/8/4  (1867 - 1965)
ROBERT ASPLAND COOPER 16.11.1869
COLEMANS BREWERY c1900
GEORGE GUNDRY WHITE Owner by 1902
Licensees :
ROBERT ASPLAND COOPER 26.08.1878
MATTHEW PARKER TENCH 12.11.1885
ROBERT ASPLAND COOPER 28.06.1887
WILLIAM COLEMAN 15.12.1888
CHARLES RUDGARD
(Coopers)
03.01.1893
GEORGE ELDEN BURRELL
(Bank Plain Restaurant)
24.06.1894
MICHAEL REDGRAVE 04.02.1902
GEORGE GUNDRY WHITE 26.07.1904
ALFRED JOHN PATEN 16.11.1937
HENRY St. JOHN BRADING PATEN 13.06.1950
FRANK EDWARD ROSSER 20.11.1951
DEREK VIVIAN BLANCHARD 19.11.1957
THOMAS BURNS 30.09.1958
STEPHEN CYRIL CHARLES SILLIFANT 22.11.1960
PATRICK NOEL GREER EDGE 14.03.1961
HENRY EDWARD BANHAM 24.11.1964
.
.
TIMOTHY VOELOKER by 1976



The original licence was in the name of the ICE HOUSE, situated on the corner of Tombland. It became known as COOPERS and in 1877 an application was made for relocation to Bank Plain.

In 1878 the business was relocated in newly constructed  premises situated on the west corner of Queen Street, St. michael at Plea.
The house became the BANK PLAIN RESTAURANT in 1894.

Structural alterations were made during 1902 and the front part facing Bank Plain was divided from the back part facing Queen Street with no connection between the two. The property facing Queen Street had been sold off.

Licence transferred to the BANK PLAIN STORES, Queen Street by 1903. (To be known as GUNDRY WHITES for many years after, but still officially the BANK PLAIN RESTAURANT)

On Tuesday 10th March 1903 the application for renewal of licence was heard. The Magistrates questioned that the new premises were not substantially the same as the old ones.
One of the magistrates, Mr. Haldenstein, had objected to the licence since his own premises were close by and claimed it would devalue his property. The magistrates consulted in private and following their discussions, Mr. Haldenstein decided not to sit.
It was heard that the Bench had previously approved the building plans and could have no objection to the licence renewal and it had been the magistrate not then sitting, who had raised objection.
After much discussion it was determined that the premises on Queen Street had previously been used as offices and liquor stores and had always been considered by the police to be licensed premises. Since the alterations had been carried out to approved plans there were no grounds to refuse licence renewal.
Thousands of pounds had been spent on the premises and if the licence was refused, the licensee, Mr. Redgrave, his wife and thirteen children would be turned out into the streets to starve.
The magistrates approved renewal but said that the case called for their very serious investigation.
A formal application for a singing licence was also granted.