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7 ROSARY ROAD THORPE HAMLET   CLOSED 18.06.1964
NORWICH LICENCE REGISTER PS 1/8/1 to PS 1/8/4 ( 1867 to 1965 )
STEWARD & Co  
STEWARD & PATTESON  
Licensees :
-  
THOMAS HOLDSWORTH * 1836 - 1842
-  
-  
WILLIAM GIBSON by 1867
FRANCIS JOSEPH ROUT 05.05.1868
JOHN ALLEN 28.07.1868
EDWARD LAKE 06.04.1869
EDWARD CHAMBERS 19.07.1870
ESTHER SWORD 10.01.1871
CHARLES BLOWERS 24.05.1872
WILLIAM ORD 20.05.1873
MARIA ORD 24.11.1874
WILLIAM SUGDEN 23.09.1875
HENRY CLARKE 25.10.1876
ROBERT CLARKE 18.11.1884
SAMUEL MAYNARD 12.09.1890
WALTER ROBERT LONG 13.10.1890
JAMES POND 10.10.1892
WILLIAM WALTER BLOOM 21.06.1921
BERTRAM WILLIAM BLOOM 1.05.1926
Convicted 28.08.1935 of selling out of hours.
Fine £3 or 21 days detention
WALTER BROOME 31.12.1935
LOUIS REGINALD CANHAM 02.01.1951
ALFRED ROWE 05.04.1951


Image shown with permission of Norfolk County Council Library & Information Service.  Click this image for link to Picture Norfolk.
c1900
Image shown with permission of
Norfolk County Council Library and Information Service


Address as Chalk Hill Road 1883.

Badly damaged by enemy action 27/29.04.1942.

S&P confirmed to the Magistrates 17.06.1964 that the house
`will shortly be closing and the licence will be surrendered'.
It closed the next day.

Sales in the final year of trading were 123 barrels of beer.

Closure agreed by the Steward & Patteson board 22nd July 1964.

 

 

 

The house adjoined Lollards Pit.
This is a hollow cut into the side of a hill and the area is known to have been used for the practice of burning at the stake.
Those who have met such a fate here include William White, Thomas Bilney and Cicely Orme.
The Bishop Alnwick declared that any Lollards found would
'hop headless' or `fry a faggot'.
Lollardy ( or Wycliffism ) originated as a religious culture c1370.
The followers of John Wycliff were to be later accused of heresy and the first orders for burning were issued by Henry IV in 1401.