NORFOLK PUBLIC HOUSES norfolkpubs.co.uk
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17 GLOBE LANE
17 SCOLES GREEN
St MICHAEL AT THORN FULL LICENCE CLOSED 1905
NORWICH LICENCE REGISTERS PS 1/8/1  to PS 1/8/2 ( 1867 - 1925 )
STEWARD & Co Freehold owned by Finch & Steward
Licensees :
-
JOHN MOORE
age 69 in 1851 - blacksmith
1822 - 1859
ELIZABETH MOORE
( At the Fair Flora in 1863 )
1861
J. B. JARVIS 1863
J. J. BACON 1864
THOMAS CATON by 1865
THOMAS CHESTER 14.03.1871
WILLIAM EDWARD DUFTY 10.10.1885
ELIZABETH EVE DUFTY 26.11.1889
SAMUEL MAYNARD 21.10.1890
EDWARD WILSON 10.10.1891
WILLIAM HENRY MACKLEY 11.08.1896
ROBERT BAKER 09.02.1897
FRANCIS EDWARD GUTTERIDGE 23.03.1897
ALICE GUTTERIDGE 08.05.1900
Convicted 20.10.1904 of allowing drunkenness.
Fine 20/- plus 20/- costs or 14 days detention


Built on the site of the HELL CELLAR and initially known as the GLOBE & SEVEN STARS.

On Thursday 9th February 1905 the Chief Constable objected to licence renewal because he considered the premises ill-conducted and the licence holder unfit. The Bench heard that Mr. Francis Gutteridge had departed for South Africa in May 1900, leaving his wife as licensee. (He had been in the Army for 26 years before becoming a licensee.)
`Drunkenness had been permitted and the place had become the haunt of prostitutes and thieves'.
Robert Wiley, who used to live next door gave evidence that during the months prior to May 1904, the house had been conducted very badly. The language used by some of the customers was `something cruel'. He had seen as many as five customers being turned out, lying on the ground outside, then taking their hats and coats up, returning into the public-house again and remaining there until turning-out time. All sorts went there, the scum of the city. Mr. Gutteridge, when he was home, was not a sober man. The barman was rather rough and not a steady man. Crowds used to assemble outside, attracted by the noise at midnight, of Gutteridge and the barman fighting.
William Kerry, labour superintendant under the Norwich Board of Guardians said he had stood outside the house, night after night, for half an hour at a time, listening to the language. Groups of little children would also assemble outside.
Licence renewal refused.