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STANLEY ARMS NORWICH S index
Stanley Arms
23 BEDFORD STREET
BRIDEWELL ALLEY
St. ANDREW 6 DAY LICENCE
from 1872
CLOSED 04.02.1911
NORWICH LICENCE REGISTERS PS 1/8/1 - PS 1/8/4 (1867 - 1965)
CHRISTOPHER BARLEY from 1858
BARLEY of Unthank Road  by 1867
Mrs BARLEY 1872
WILLIAM EDWARDS Market Place, 1879
BULLARDS 1884
Licensees :
CHRISTOPHER BARLEY
(Died by 17 December 1858)
23.08.1858
-  
LOVICK ANSTEAD BROWNE 1864 - 1866
Mrs MARY BARLEY 28.08.1866
JOSEPH BANKS by 1867
JOHN PUXLEY WATSON 17.11.1868
WILLIAM BENSLEY 24.06.1879
MARY BENSLEY 11.05.1880
MARTIN LAMBERT 24.06.1880
MICHAEL DODSON 02.07.1885
EDWARD ELLIS HARVEY 29.06.1886
Convicted 20.03.1897 of selling adulterated brandy.
Fine 10/- plus 8/- costs or 7 days detention.
JABEZ CHARLES BIRCH 28.12.1897
FREDERICK HORNAGOLD 10.10.1898
JOHN DYE 08.05.1900
ROBERT CORRICK 18.12.1900
WILLIAM HEMNELL 01.12.1903
JOHN KIRBY HILTON HINDE 10.05.1904
JOSEPH SWARBRICK 20.08.1904
EDWARD BUNN 09.02.1905

A new licence was issued to Christopher Barley on Monday 23rd August 1858. It was heard that he had been at the (Golden) FLEECE in Bridewell Alley for 19 years and had always conducted it respectfully. He had recently purchased the Bedford Street property for which the application had been made.
It is uncertain if Mr. Barley ever ran the STANLEY ARMS since he had died by December 1858 and Mrs Barley continued to run the GOLDEN FLEECE to at least 1861.

Amelia Fenton was a barmaid here in March 1865 when she was accused by customer Henry Bingham of an assault. On Monday 6th March it was claimed that Fenton had called Bingham a `twopenny ha'penny tailor' and a snob. Witnesses agreed that earlier Bingham had insulted the barmaid, which he denied. Fenton had requested him to leave and he refused so she produced a stick and attempted to hit his hat and shoulders. He took the stick and broke it. She then went to the bar and threw the contents of several glasses over him. Not content with that she drew four or five pints of beer and poured them over him. Upon her finding another stick and getting more beer to throw over him, he eventually left. Unfortunately for Mr. Bingham, the witnesses that he expected to support his case had refused to attend unless subpoenaed. One witness who did attend said that Bingham was drunk when he came in, made bad comment about the jewellery that the barmaid was wearing, called her many ill-names and accused her of taking money from the till of Mr. Brown(e). The case was dismissed.

On Thursday 29th March 1866, Lovick A. Browne was charged with receiving four stolen guns, the property of the Great Eastern Railway.
Known as `Count' Browne, he had paid persons named Shadwell and Trew, the sum of `eight quid' for the double-barrelled guns. Committed to trial on the receiving offence, a further charge of stealing and receiving fifteen pairs of boots, also the property of the railway company, was added.
In the application for bail, Browne was said to be a widower with a family, in a respectable position in life and if he were not free, then his large business would go to rack and ruin.
The bail application was refused on the grounds that justice may be defeated if it were granted and it was believed that large amounts of (Railway) property had passed through the prisoner's hands and otherwise honest men had been led into temptation.

On Saturday 7th April 1866, Mr. Lovick Browne was charged with receiving stolen tobacco. Messrs. Thorn Smyth and Company of Boston had sent a cask containing 70lbs of shag tobacco by rail to Mr. Lambert of Norwich on 13th November 1865. When it was delivered it only contained 36lbs.
It was heard that on 18th November 1865,  tobacconist John Stevens purchased some 35lbs of shag tobacco from Browne at 2s 4d per lb. It was not in good condition and only fit to be made into snuff.
(Another tobacconist, Jeremiah Green, gave evidence that he had previously purchased 27lbs of shag tobacco from Browne for the sum of 2s 6d per lb. The transaction said to have occurred in October 1865.)
Lovick Anstead Browne was committed to trial and it was said that he had been in custody since 21st March 1866 and that other articles had been discovered that were thought to be the property of the Railway Company. Bail was refused.

At the Annual Licensing Meeting held 28th August 1866 it was reported that the licence, formerly held by Lovick Ansted Browne was granted to the owner of the property, Mrs Mary Barley.

Licence renewal opposed August 1891 on the grounds that there was no need for the house.
The objector was a printer named Mr. C. Gallpen who had only lived in the street for six months and apparently picked this house at random from the total of nine houses in Bedford Street.
Nobody had been called to give evidence of nuisance or disturbance and even Mr. Gallpen was not put in the witness box.
The house had been licensed by the magistrates since 1867 a perfectly lawful trade had been carried on ever since.
The tenant, Mr. Harvey, had invested £134 out of his savings in taking the house, for which he paid £50 a year in rent.
The magistrates could not see why this house had been picked out from the others, except perhaps it was the only one with a six day licence.<Laughter in court>
Licence renewed.
On 22nd August 1891 a music and singing licence was applied for. Every night, with the exception of Saturday, a professional pianist played operatic and other selections in the bar. On a Saturday the entertainment was in the club-room.
Application refused.


Licence provisionally refused 08.03.1909 and referred to Compensation.
Referred for Compensation (again) 31.01.1911.
Closed under Compensation 04.02.1911