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TABERS FOLLY NORWICH Index
180 OAK STREET St. MARTIN AT OAK - CLOSED
 
CHITTY & LESSINGHAM to 1752
TOMPSON 1752 - 1845
MORGANS  From 1845
Licensees :
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Dated from at least 1742.

Conveyed by Joseph Chitty & Elizabeth Lessingham to Stackhouse Tompson & James Tompson in 1752

The TWO NECKED SWAN by 1806

( Conveyed by Tompsons to Morgans 25th March 1845. )

Stuart McLaren advises 21.08.2007 :-

The Tabers Folly is on a plan of Norwich dated 1746 in Francis Blomefield's History Of Norwich, where the name appears to be an alternative local name for the Justing (Jousting) Acre. This long, narrow strip of land lay to the south of the city wall between St Martin's Gate and St Augustine's Gate. It was in use in medieval times for practising tilting on horseback, archery and for jousting tournaments. Edward III is thought to have attended a tournament there on St Valentines Day, 1340.

By the 17th century the area had become a place where Norwich's citizens gathered in large numbers on summer evenings and holidays to make merry. In 1671 the Norwich Bellman was ordered to give notice to the `Inhabitants beyond the Water that they forbear to spoil the Grass in the Gilding Croft by immoderate Campings and Dauncing there'.
`Camping' or `Camp Ball' was an early very rough form of football played by two large teams.

On Samuel King's plan of Norwich of 1766, the Tabers Folly is shown as a distinct square bordered by buildings on two sides on the east side of St Martin at Oak Lane near St Martin's Gate. To the south of this area the plan names a larger, open area called the Folly Grounds.
Possibly the tavern took its name from the local name for the area, an area where tabor players entertained people as they caroused, danced or played camp ball.