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FISHING BOAT GORLESTON index
127 HIGH STREET St ANDREWS WARD BEERHOUSE See VOLUNTEER
CANN & CLARKE Included in sale of Wymondham Brewery Estate to Morgans 11.05.1894
MORGANS  
STEWARD & PATTESON (at some time between 1903 & 1907 - as the Volunteer)
Licensees :
-  
SAMUEL BARBER
(Tinplate worker at High Street in 1858 -  Beerhouse 1859 to1864 - Tinplate worker, brazier, blacksmith and net tanner & Fish Merchant & Curer at High Street 1865, not listed under beerhouses.)
1859 - * 1864
Accused of selling out of hours on the evening of Sunday 9th October 1859
Charged Monday 21st November 1859 of having his house open, and persons drinking within, on Thursday 17th November, after midnight.
At the suggestion of the Mayor he pleaded guilty and put 5s into the poor box.
(Full) licence application refused Monday 27th August 1860, as were all the other applications from 24 beerhouses in Yarmouth and Gorleston.
-  
GEORGE TUFFS 1879
ISAAC MARSHALL
age 38
(Died Q1 1893 - age 50)
* 1881
WILLIAM FARMAN * 1883
J BARBER 1886
WILLIAM FARMAN
& fish shop
Age 64 in 1891
Died Q3 1897
1891 - 1896
SAMUEL GODDARD * 1900
CHARLOTTE BUTCHER
Age 54
(Died March 1932 - age 87)
1901


In court Monday 10th October 1859, Samuel Barber was accused of having 29 people drinking in his house at a quarter past eleven on the previous night. The defendant swore that no drinks had been drawn after eleven o'clock and it was he who asked the police to clear the house. The request was said to have been refused, but this was denied by the constable.
The defendant was discharged after agreeing to put 5s in the poor box.

On Wednesday 19th October 1859, Barber was again in court complaining of dereliction of duty of police sergeant Fryer, in not preventing a disturbance near the FISHING BOAT, on the previous Saturday. The charge was rebutted and it was alleged that Barber and another man had in fact been guilty of `the most riotous conduct' on that night.

On Thursday 20th October 1859, Samuel Barber accused Sergeant Joseph Fryer of neglecting his duty and insulting him. Initially the magistrates said the matter was for the Watch Committee, not them, but when Barber changed the charge to assault, it was agreed that the case would be heard the following Tuesday.

On Tuesday 25th October 1859, Samuel Barber accused Sergeant Fryer of misconduct. Some time previously, Barber had wrongly been accused of being drunk and disorderly, later he had been accused of having his house open at an illegal hour. That case had been dismissed with a caution. Since then it was alleged that Fryer had dogged Barber's movements, watched his house, injured his trade and interfered with him.
On 15th October, Barber, with several friends, including Mr and Mrs Anderson, headed the fifty or so yards to the HORSE & GROOM when Fryer came up and put his hand under Mrs Anderson's bonnet! He then stared into the face of Barber and his friends without speaking.
Fryer claimed that Barber had perjured himself and all of his witnesses had materially contradicted each other. He had merely carried out his duty in clearing several people who had congregated. Barber had been very abusive and a greater rascal or scoundrel did not exist.
The bench dismissed the charge.


Before the Magistrates on Monday 26th November 1860, Samuel Barber confirmed that the previous day, he had made a complaint against Sergeant Fryer to Sergeant Barnes at the station-house. It was apparently a practice at the court that by payment of 2s, an accuser could `order up' the offender to appear in court. In spite of the accusation of neglect of duty and threatening language, Sergeant Barnes had refused to order Fryer to attend the court and said it was a matter for the Watch Committee, he did however put the matter of threatening language `on the slate'.
The representative in court for Mr. Barber argued that it was not for the police to decide where complaints against the police were to be heard.
The case continued the following day and eventually the charges were dismissed by a show of hands by the magistrates, nine for dismissal, three against. The representative for Sergeant Fryer called for sureties of the peace, as he had been called a `false swearing rascal', and threats and impertinent observations had been made.


The VOLUNTEER by 1903

 

Entry No 374 in Licence Register (Volunteer)