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SILK MILLS TAVERN Gt. YARMOUTH S index
74 St. NICHOLAS ROAD MARKET WARD FULL LICENCE CLOSED
Gt. YARMOUTH LICENCE REGISTERS Y/CJ/31 - Y/CJ/32 ( February 1903 - February 1953 )  & PS 18/14/3 ( 1973 - 1980 )
STEWARD & PATTESON   
WATNEY MANN   
..    
Licensees :
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JOHN RACKHAM 1845
WILLIAM LAKE 1854 - 1856
FREDERICK  WATSON 1858 - 1868
WILLIAM STEPHEN BENNETT 1869 - 1872
THOMAS WILLIAM MAYES
& Stonemason journeyman
1875 - 1881
BERTLEY LAMBERT 1883
 R LAMBERT 1886
HENRY ISAAC HANNANT 1888 - 1892
ALFRED HENRY THOMAS 1900
FREDERICK SHIPSTON
( manager )
1901
ERNEST WALTER CROWE by 1903
FRED SAUNDERS 29.10.1909
CHARLES HENRY DEW 11.04.1913
ALICE ELIZABETH DEW 11.08.1916
CHARLES HENRY DEW 11.04.1919
JOHN OLIVER TRAILL 06.01.1925
BEATRICE ELEANOR TRAILL 04.01.1927
ARTHUR CHARLES WISEMAN 06.11.1928
FREDERICK ERNEST NICHOLS 30.10.1934
GEORGE WILLIAM NICHOLS 01.07.1941
JAMES ALBERT FREDERICK SYMONDS CLIFTON 04.05.1948
DANIEL SAUNDERS 09.06.1959
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Address as Denes 1845

Given as the MILL HOUSE 1854.
The SILK MILLS INN 1879.
67 St Nicholas Road in 1881
As the SILK MILLS HOTEL, 76 St. Nicholas Road in 1892.

Became the PINBALL WIZARD c1980.

The SILK MILLS by 2000

On Monday 7th January 1852, landlord John Rackham was committed to trial, but subsequently bailed, on a charge of cheating at cards.
It was heard that Rackham had sat down with a man named Utting to play cribbage at one sovereign a game. Rackham won the first three games but Utting won the next two because he caught Rackham pegging too many. They then agreed to play four last games for progressive sums of £2, £4, £8 and £16 of which Rackham won the first three. It was during the fourth game that an observer named Howlett tackled Rackham for having a card concealed in his lap.


It was reported at the licensing session held 31st August 1852 that the house had been found open till after twelve on the previous Saturday night. The licensee was unfortunately in prison at the time for cheating at cards. Since the tenant was under notice to quit, the magistrates felt that the licence should not be refused and that the man was suffering from his crime and should not be further punished.

On the night of Saturday 17th September 1859 the house was found to be open after legal time. Licensee Watson said that his wife was only cleaning up at that time and denied selling anything after midnight, except for some brandy which was required for an old lady who was ill. To save expense, Watson admitted guilt and was fined `the usual sum of 5s.'

Damaged by enemy action during WWII - no date specified.

 

An Oriental restaurant / takeaway by May 2008