NORFOLK PUBLIC HOUSES norfolkpubs.co.uk
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PLOUGH  CARLETON RODE index
FLAXLAND
ROD LANE
DEPWADE HUNDRED BEERHOUSE later FULL LICENCE CLOSED 1981
CANN & CLARKE Wymondham Brewery
MORGANS Sold to Morgans 11.05.1894
STEWARD & PATTESON from 1961
WATNEY MANN 1967 - 1981
Licensees :
-
SAMUEL AUSTIN
& shoemaker
age 53 in 1851
( shoemaker & beerhouse 1854, only shoemaker mentioned 1856 )
* 1836 - 1854
JOHN CHATTEN
& dealer
age 41 in 1871
1861 - 1896
JAMES FREDERICK CHATTEN
age 33 in 1901
1900 - 1908
HENRY WILSON 1911 - 1912
ROBERT JOHN ROUT 1915 - 1916
ERNEST S WILKINSON 1922
LEONARD LAWN 1925
ARTHUR WAKEFIELD 1929 - 1933
JOHN HENRY TOOKE 1937
CHARLES LAWN
( Charlie & Elsie )
by Oct 1947
GEORGE FOREMAN 1952 - 1955
EDWARD DADE ( Ted ) 1955 - 1963
BERT & VALERIE ROBINSON c1964
BILLY RUSH to closure
c1925 image provided 12.01.05 by Peter & Judy Page.
c1925 with Leonard Lawn licensee.

Sold by auction (at the ADAM & EVE, Carleton Rode), Wednesday 19th July 1837. Described as a Messuage, used as a Beerhouse, called the Plough, with yard and garden, in the occupation of Mr Samuel Austin.

It was reported to the magistrates at the Annual Licensing Session held 12th February 1907, that the only complaint over the previous year, regarding any house in the district, had been against the PLOUGH. There was however, no objection to licence renewal.
( Offence believed to have been keeping house open late at night .)

Morgans sales 1960 :-
Barrels of beer 50
Spirits 11

Bullards proposed closure at First Joint Committee Meeting of Bullards and S&P 29th May 1962, S&P did not agree.
Sales given as 50 barrels.


c1945 : Fred Chapman ( centre ) in the Plough.
Image provided by Phil Bowden - many thanks

Ian Dade - son of Ted Dade advises 31.08.2004:-
` The picture shows the interior of the bar as it was when I first lived there, some alterations being later made in the late 1950's or early 1960's.
On the extreme left may well be George Carver. Next with the cap and pipe is Harry Smith. He lived in the village and called at the pub in course of his collection of the Labour Party tote money. He sits next to Fred Chapman, who could often be persuaded to give a rendition of ``Suzannah's a funicle pig/sow '', a song never heard from anybody else! Self-accompanied by much snorting and whistling! Next to Fred it may well be Margaret Brooks, later to marry John Moore, and next to her is Enid Revell. '