NORFOLK PUBLIC HOUSES norfolkpubs.co.uk
NORFOLK NORWICH GT. YARMOUTH KINGS LYNN NAME SEARCH PUBLICATIONS LINKS MYSTERY HOME
CARPENTERS ARMS GRIMSTON Index
POTT ROW FREEBRIDGE-LYNN HUNDRED FULL LICENCE CLOSED after 1981
FREEHOUSE Owned by Mrs A Elwes of Congham to 1910.
Owned by E. H. Spragg.
YOUNGS, CRAWSHAY & YOUNGS From 1930s
BULLARDS 1958
WATNEY MANN 1967
Licensees :
-
-  
ROBERT BALDING junior
& carpenter
(age 40 in 1861 - BUT age 47 in 1871 & 55 in 1881 ?)
Died Q1 1885 - age 62
* 1858 - 1885
Mrs CAROLINE BALDING
( age 52 in 1891 )
* 1885 - 1892
ROBERT LAKE * 1896
Mrs CAROLINE BALDING 1900
WALTER RUSKIN * 1901 -
here January 1909
Fined £2 16s 6d in January 1909 for allowing gambling. See below.
Mr John W KINCH 1910
ALBERT EDWARD FRANCIS
& carpenter & joiner
(Died June 1954 - age 75)
by 1911
ALBERT JAMES HOOKS
( Known as Joe - his wife Ruth,
being the daughter of A E Francis)
05.07.1954
Still behind the bar 1981



Walter Ruskin was summoned January 1909 for allowing a game of chance on the premises, held 24th December 1908.
Police Constable Bartram had witnessed the game at 9:30pm and said that he advised the accused that he had no right to hold a game of chance. He claimed that he had been offered a brace of rabbits to take no notice of it.
Sidney Bunting of Grimston had been at the house at 7pm and had seen several people `spinning' for prizes on a table in the back room. He had won some sausages, a man named Hutson won a chicken, Arthur Twite got some ale. John Planks won the beef. Everyone paid 6d to enter the competition and 2d to enter a raffle. A man named William Rudd had provided rabbits as prizes. The ale was `four-half'. Thomas Sandle, a fish hawker, had a `spin' and won four rabbits, he had also paid 2d to take part in a raffle for the rabbits. Mr Sandle confirmed that he had been in several raffles before, and had won a prize of ale at another house.
Mr Ruskin had admitted the offence but was unaware that `spinning' was not allowed.
Acting for the defendant, Mr Wilkin said that during the past fortnight it had been admitted at the Divisional Court that Whist Drives might be tolerated.........that was unquestionable law today and therefore, if they were so in the dark as not to know what was gaming and what was not .... he thought Mr Wilkin should be let off.
Mr Wilkin had been `spinning' every Christmas since he had been in the house. He had been warned previously about `drawing' but not `spinning'.
The Magistrates took the view that `spinning' was the same as `drawing'
and imposed a fine of £2 16s 6d, including costs, with the warning that if the offence was repeated, the fine would be £10.

 

The Carpenters Arms - c1967
c1980

At Wong Lane 1891
( Known as Vong Lane into recent times )
Chapel Lane today.

Severely damaged by fire 1910 and substantially rebuilt.
The original Carpenters Arms adjoined a butchers shop.
Just after midnight, early Tuesday 27th September 1910, Mrs Rudd, occupant of the butchers, was awoken by the coughing of her baby. Finding a great deal of smoke in the room she raised her husband, who hastily dressed and escaped through a back bed-room window. Mrs Rudd then handed down their three children and finally Mr Rudd helped her down. The mother and children were entirely without clothes, except their night-dresses. All of their clothes were lost to the fire. Luckily a sister of Mrs Rudd, Mrs Youngs, lived nearby and took them all in.
As soon as his family were secure, Mr Rudd aroused Mr & Mrs Kinch and family, occupants of the public house, who fortunately had time to effect their escape and obtain clothing.
Several neighbours had been aroused and attempted to douse the flames, but `as so often as occurs in country districts' there was insufficient water to cope with the fire.
The buildings being old, the fire raged quickly through them both. Rudd's furniture was totally destroyed, but he was insured.
Mr Kinch was able to save a good deal of his furniture, but was not insured.

Owned after 1910 by local builder R. H. Spragg
and rented to A. E. Francis. ( As a freehouse ).
Mr Francis is credited with building the bar which
survived to the 1980s.

During WWII beer deliveries are said to have arrived once a fortnight at Grimston Road Station.


House closed and converted to private dwelling by 1985.