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WHITE HART NEEDHAM Index
HIGH ROAD EARSHAM HUNDRED BEERHOUSE CLOSED c1907
JAMES MATTHEWS to at least 1836.
YOUNGS, CRAWSHAY & YOUNGS
Licensees :
-  
JAMES MATTHEWS
Beer Retailer
1836 - 1839
JAMES ANDREWS
Beer Shop & Horse Dealer
*1846
THOMAS MATTHEWS
Brewer
*1851
WILLIAM RAYNER
(age 49 in 1851)
*1856 - *1858
MARY R. RAYNER
(age 57 in 1861)
1861
WILLIAM RAYNER 1863
Mrs MARY R. RAYNER 1864 - 1877
ROBERT R. RAYNER
(age 39 in 1881)
*1879 - *1885
JABEZ GIRLING *1888
JAMES PARTRIDGE *1891
GEORGE EBBAGE
& farmer
*1892
WILLIAM RYE 1896 - 1897
-  
-  
-  
ARTHUR LEE 1905

 

Probably the WHITE HART as recorded as the meeting place of overseers, held 3rd December 1733.


Offered For Sale by Auction Wednesday 21st September 1836 with about 7 Acres of Arable and Pasture Land. In occupation of Mr. James Matthews, the proprietor.
Also included a double cottage, barn, stable and workshops.
An extensive trade in the Hemp-cloth Manufactory having been carried out on the Premises for many years. Beer being licensed to be sold and consumed thereon.
Land Tax 16s. Quit-rent 6d.


Leasehold property sold by Youngs, Crawshay & Youngs Partnership to Youngs, Crawshay & Youngs Company
as document dated 27th November 1897
for completion 1st February 1898.

Licence renewal deferred at the sessions held Friday 10th February 1905 on the grounds of redundancy.
Tenant to attend next meeting to state why the licence should be renewed.

On Friday 30th June 1905 the Renewal Authority took into account that, (1) There were an excessive number of houses, a population of 303 shared three houses, one licence for every 104 people. (2) The house was in a remote location. (3) There had been three tenants within two years. (4) This was a beerhouse whilst the other two were fully licensed. (5) There was no evidence adduced to the trade done, leaving the justices to conclude that it was of small extent.
Superintendant Southgate gave his opinion that the house was not required.
In support of the licence it was said that there was no redundancy in the locality and the tenant was able to make a living from the house and some land attached to it.
Licence refused.

At the Harleston Brewster Sessions held Friday 9th February 1906 it was heard that the licence had been referred for Compensation in 1905 and the licence had been extinguished by the Quarter Sessions, however trade was still being carried on at that time. In consequence the licence was renewed.