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TURNPIKE LAUNDITCH HUNDRED FULL LICENCE CLOSED 1934
MITFORD & LAUNDITCH LICENCE REGISTERS PS 12/5/1 & PS 12/5/2 (1901 to 1975)
FREEHOUSE First supplied as freehouse by Steward & Patteson during the year November 1848 - 1849
BULLARDS by 1866 (Lease - Later purchased)
Licensees :
-
-  
WILLIAM TOOK
age 34 in 1851
& tailor
(& blacksmith 1856)
*1851 - *1856
HENRY JUDE
Age 50 in 1861
1861 - *1865
WILLIAM TUCK
(Also listed in 1868 directory)
*1867
ROBERT HAMMOND
Age 59 in 1891
11.10.1867 - 1892
WALTER WARD 1896
ROBERT JAMES OLIVER 1900 to 1906
HEDLEY KIRKHAM 09.02.1906
Fine 10/- plus 4/- costs for being open during prohibited hours - 14.02.1908
HENRY HERBERT TAYLOR 15.10.1909
Fine £1 plus 4/- costs for being open out of hours - 1910
WILLIAM ROBINSON 18.10.1912
WALTER GIRDLESTONE 09.04.1915
WILLIAM ROBERSON 19.08.1927
HERBERT CYRIL FREEZER 29.08.1930
DAVID ALBERT COOK 27.05.1932
DOUGLAS ARTHUR OLIVER BAKER 24.11.1933



Bullards purchased the house and adjacent row of cottages in 1877 for the sum of £575.

Landlord Hammond appears in a Bullards report dated August 1871 where his licence is said to require attention (Not detailed).

The Lynn Advertiser of 3rd June 1910 reported that P.c Aldiss and P.c. Brett had visited the house at 10:30pm on the 8th May. The door was locked but talking was heard within. Upon knocking at the door and announcing police presence there were sound of hasty movements. Upon being let in the constables found a man named Sayer at the bar, James and Edward Eagling in a private room and William Wiseman hiding in a cupboard. (He said he did not know why he was in there). Licensee Taylor said he was very sorry but it was a very wet night and he did not realise it was so late.
Edward Sayer said he was a lodger and the case against him was dismissed.
The others were fined 10s each.

~

On 26th April 1912 the Lynn Advertiser reported that Henry Herbert Taylor was summoned for selling intoxicating drinks during prohibited hours. On Sunday 31st March 1912, at 11:45pm P.c. Palmer and P.c. Aldis had visited the premises and found George Barnes, Bertie Barnes, Ernest Barnes, Samuel Draper, Jessie Emms, George Gibson and Albert Wilson, as well as Taylor's daughter and other family members.
Evidence of drinking was on the tables. P.c. Palmer had entered by the back door; when P.c. Aldis entered the front somebody had rushed out and was apprehended. This man, Long, was said to be the worse for drink. Taylor said that all were his friends and had been invited to welcome home his daughter who had returned from holiday. Taylor was reported to have said to the constable that `since he had been nipped before he would have the best lawyer that money could buy to best you.'
Superintendant Roy gave evidence that Taylor came to see him the next morning and produced a postcard, which he said had been sent by his daughter, announcing her arrival and that he had invited several of the chaps to the welcome home. The Superintendant advised that he had been warned before that customers served before ten could not be converted to friends afterwards.
Defended by Mr. Russell Steward, it was submitted that there was no evidence of selling. The Chairman said the case was a very proper one for the police to bring, but there was insufficient evidence for prosecution. Superintendant Roy offered no evidence against those found on the premises. All charges were dismissed.

~

The house closed 1934 and the licence was transferred to another district.