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NORFOLK PUBLIC HOUSES norfolkpubs.co.uk
NORFOLK NORWICH GT. YARMOUTH KINGS LYNN NAME SEARCH PUBLICATIONS LINKS MYSTERY HOME
POPINJAY NORWICH P index
UPPER KING STREET St. GEORGE TOMBLAND   CLOSED
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Licensees :
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Mr. BLANE 1610
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HERCULES FOSTER 1658
ROBERT GYRDELER 17.04.1661
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THOMAS SEAMAN
( Brewer )
here 1679
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.... HOWMAN 1739 - * 1747
JACOB HATT
died 1751
to 1751
JOHN WRIGHT
labourer
( Declared bankrupt September 1761 )
June 1751 - 1761
CHARLES FEARMAN ( Freeman?) 1762
JANE READ widow
( Location as St. James ? )
1763 - 1764
JOHN SLANEY 1783
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JACOB WATSON
Went to Kings Head - Coltishall by August 1794
to 1794
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Popinjay = Parrot

In 1747 Dr. Howman paid rent for tenement and ground, late William Gilman and late Robert Popingay, now of Isaac Preston, Fisher Colman, Esq. and Charles Freeman.
In 1761 the same belonged to William Riches.

Location believed to have been on the East corner of King Street and Tombland, partially on the site of St. Cuthberts Church.

25th April 1507
`A fire broke out near an Inn called the Popinjay in Tombland, near the cathedral. With thatched roofs quickly catching the flames, it spread towards St Andrews and the Franciscan Monastery there............it took four days to burn itself out.'


Said to have been the dwelling of the Popinjay family.
( F. Blomefield gives as Papingay , also found as Pappinjay )

18th March 1560 - cordwainer Thomas Love of Martham ( and wife Margaret ) conveyed a tenement, formerly the property of Robert Popingay to John Dennye Esq., and his wife Anne. Location given as between tenements to the west and east, the highway to the south and a tenement to the north, late the property of Henry Vyell, then of John Denny, called the CAGE.

In the will of carrier William Stevenson, dated 30th January 1620, proved 30th July 1621, the Messuage known by the name of the Poppyngay was bequeathed to his wife Ellen ( or Helen ), on condition that when she reached 21, she was to pay each of their three sons, William, Richard and Augustine, the sum of £20 Their daughter Grace to receive £100. Elizabeth Norman, the daughter of Mrs. Ellen Stevenson and other persons were named in the will.

The property had been owned by John Weaver and upon his death passed to his cousin, also John Weaver as did the appurtenances of the late William Stevenson who by his will of 1620 had given to his wife Helen, his widow. She married John Howell who sold to fishmonger Thomas Weaver on 22nd April 1634 which by a will dated 18th November 1635, had passed to the above John and then his cousin.

Mentioned in the trial of Royalist rioters in 1648, following the blowing up of the Committee House.

On 31st October 1670, John Weaver of Carleton Rode, a worstead weaver and Hester his wife, sold to John Gilman, a woolcomber, the POPINGAY, occupied by William More, before of Robert Elsed and late Thomas Weaver and of Benjamin Forrest then of Hercules Foster.

It was announced 1st & again 8th June 1751 that the house, an ancient and commodious Inn,  had been taken by John Wright, cook from Emmanuel College, Cambridge. He informed the Publick that the house had been fitted with clean bedding and all other convenient furniture. The house had for many years previously been occupied by Mr Jacob Hatt, deceased.
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26 September 1761
To be Let and entered on Michaelmas next.
The POPINJAY INN standing very pleasantly and conveniently on Tombland in the city of Norwich, now in the occupation of Mr. John Wright. This inn is generally known from its being the oldest and most frequented of any in the City, that it needs no other description or Recommendations.

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On 17th February 1776, Mr. Fletcher, Hosier, advertised his Warehouse at the Corner of Tombland, opposite the House, late the Popinjay Inn.

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A sale of properties situated in Reepham, was held here Saturday 15th December 1792.

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All the complete, new, and valuable Household Furniture of Jacob Watson was offered for sale by auction, on the premises, Friday 3rd & 4th July 1794. `Consisting of an elegant mahogany wardrobe bedstead, complete, four-post and other bedsteads, with morine, check and other hangings, a capital set of mahogany dining table, with circular ends, an excellent eight-day clock, in a beautiful mahogany case, a small handsome mahogany dining table, curious wood, four dozen mahogany sunk-seat chairs, elbow to ditto, a complete table service of pearl earth, blue edged, a neat brass jack, glass case, brass ball, &c. with a variety of other useful furniture as will be expressed in the catalogues.
The whole of the mahogany furniture is of the best wood, manufactured by good workmen and as they have been in use for only two years are in excellent condition, and calculated either for a genteel tavern or private family.... '

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A dog named `Fuddle' was employed at one time to turn the kitchen spit