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St. MARGARETS STREET St. MARGARET FULL LICENCE CLOSED 1866
STEWARD & Co  
Licensees :
-  
-
SAMUEL CROSS 1862
WILLIAM HOWES By July 1864.
Here 1865


Listed in Steward & Patteson Trust Deed dated 6th November 1837 to November 1851.

Property described as Freehold, owned by Finch & Steward, first supplied during the year commencing November 1848.

Apparently trading under Steward & Co in 1852 but no further detail found.

Samuel Cross was charged, Thursday 10th April 1862 of knowingly allowing persons of a notoriously bad character to assemble at his house. Sergeant Smith had observed three returned convicts drinking at the bar and informed the woman in charge of the house that they should not be served. Cross was found and told to instruct his barmaid of the character of the persons in the house. Cross said that he had refused to sell them (any more) beer and told them to go, but they would not leave. The Bench dismissed the case with a caution.

At the Annual Licensing Meeting held 28th August 1866 it was reported that there had been an affray at the house between two brothers named Watson, which resulted in the death of one and the conviction of the other for manslaughter. The Chief Constable stated that the house was generally very badly conducted and was frequently the scene of frightful quarrels.
The Magistrates cancelled the licence.

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Thomas Lemmon (26) shoemaker and Phoebe Edgar (23), shoebinder were accused of passing three counterfeit florins at the house of William Howes on 22nd April 1864 and one counterfeit shilling at the house of John Huggins (Spread Eagle) on 1st June 1864. At the hearing held Tuesday 21st June 1864, the jury found the accused guilty with Lemmon sentenced to one year's imprisonment, the last week of each month to be spent in solitary confinement and Edgar to serve nine months' imprisonment.

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Brothers George (28) and William (25) Watson met at the house on the night of Saturday 29th September 1865. George lived with his parents in Cockey Yard, St Swithins, just past the Drum, whereas William, known as Boots, cohabited with a woman in St Johns Head Yard, St Michael at Coslany. They passed angry words about a lurcher and George, being the larger of the two, was the first to strike a blow. In a moment of passion William picked up a poker and struck his brother a tremendous blow over the left eye and the unfortunate man was left totally insensible. Assisted by another man in the house, William carried his brother to his parents home and, at the said request of George, left him on the doorstep. He was found sometime later and taken into the house. The following morning the doctor was called but the poor fellow died before the gentleman arrived.
Both George and William were known to the police and had frequently appeared in the law-courts, especially for poaching. William eluded the police until the Monday morning when he volunteered his whereabouts and was found in the company of his paramour on Mousehold Heath.

William `Boots ' Watson was found guilty of manslaughter.

Norfolk News 7th October 1865