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Jolly Topers index
140 OAK STREET St. MARTIN AT OAK   See FANCIERS ARMS
NORWICH LICENCE REGISTERS PS 1/8/1 to PS 1/8/3 ( 1867 - 1953 )
FREE TRADE Leasehold of the Parish, with 27 years unexpired in 1835
STEWARD & Co Leasehold owned by Steward, Patteson, Finch & Co
Licensees :
-  
SOLOMON PARISH
( Insolvent Debtor by February 1832 )
1830
THOMAS RIX 1836
ROBERT RICHES
Age 40 in 1842
To 1842
WILLIAM HOWARD 1842
ALFRED LEE
according to White
1845
WILLIAM HUMPHREY
according to Magistrates 1845
( Beer retailer, Oak Street 1846 )
1845 - * 1846
Mr. GOWARD 1847
Convicted 23rd March 1847 of allowing gambling - Fined 10s and costs, plus a warning about his future conduct.
-  
ROBERT ROSE 1854
JOHN FRENCH CALVER 25.03.1854
JOHN BENSLEY
& plumber
* 1858 - 1861



Part of the estate of brewer Thomas Foyson, who died prior to March 1832. House to be sold by auction September 1833.

Lot 6 in sale held Saturday 30th May 1835 upon the direction of the proprietor Mr. Howell along with properties in Norwich ( Heigham, St Peter Mancroft, St Gregory & St John Timberhill ), Hellesdon, Wymondham and Acle.

Licensee Robert Riches was charged on Wednesday 25th March 1842 of having received on 27th February 1842, six hens, two chickens and one cockerel, knowing them to be stolen. He was found guilty and sentenced to 12 months hard labour. A further charge of having received two hens and a bantam, also knowing them to be stolen was raised. Found guilty, 6 months' hard labour was added to the original sentence. ( Another Robert Riches is given at the Black Horse, St Giles Road [ Earlham Road ] in 1839, 1842, 1845 & 1846 )

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It was reported 27th March 1847 that on the Morning of Sunday 21st March 1847 at three o'clock, a party of men, including William Howes ( a weaver ), were let in to the JOLLY TOPERS, St. Martin's at Oak, and allowed to drink and gamble with dice until six o'clock in the morning. Over that time Mr. Howes borrowed £4 from Mr. Goward, which he lost. Leaving the house, Howes then informed constable Brazill.
Before the magistrates on Tuesday 23rd March 1847 Goward was fined 10s with costs and Howes was reprimanded for gambling on a Sunday morning.

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It was reported 22nd May 1847 that on 15th April 1847, a number of persons had been gambling with dice at the DOLPHIN, Heigham. ( Note there was also a DOLPHIN at 56 Oak Street. Could the report of Heigham be in error? )
The 8 or 9 people involved included Goward, the son ( * daughter? ) of the licensee of the JOLLY TOPERS, Heigham, and a person named William Howes. By well after midnight Howes had lost several shillings and wanting more play the parties took the dice on to the JOLLY TOPERS which they entered at three o'clock in the morning.
After more play Howes had lost all his money and borrowed £3 10s ( From licensee Mr. Goward ?) which he duly lost.
It seems the Magistrates got to hear of the late night/early morning gaming and Mr. Goward was convicted of allowing gambling in the house.
In the Small Debts Court on Wednesday 19th and Thursday 20th May Goward attempted to recover the money that he had lent, alleging he had not known for what reason it had been borrowed.
The Judge found for the defendant saying that gambling debts were not recoverable in a Court of Law according to `the 9th of Queen Anne'.

* The article initially says Goward was the assistant to her father, but later the same article says he.

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In June 1847 Mr. Henry Goward, publican, was in custody along with John Self, publican, James Green, watchmaker, William Hardy, mill foreman, John Cushion, a lad working under Hardy, a woman named Young, who had been living with Self and shopkeeper Robert C Sidney. All had been arrested for being implicated in the Corn Robbery at Saxlingham Mill.
On the 5th June 1847 it had been reported that there had been suspicions for some time that 15 to 20 coombs of wheat were being stolen every week from Saxlingham Mill. In consequence the police had been on watch on all roads leading to the mill and on the night of Saturday 29th May, Goward had been stopped when driving a horse and cart with wheat in it. When `suffered' to make its own way, the horse went directly to the mill and stopped. It would seem that frequent visits had been made.
On Wednesday 9th June, Young was further remanded on evidence given against her by a girl called Smee. It was also heard that a miller, from Keswick and a brother-in-law of Hardy, had been arrested.
On the 11th June James Green and John Cushion were discharged.
220 coombs of wheat were said to have been stolen since Christmas. It was believed that the stolen wheat was processed by the arrested miller and that Goward and Self were the receivers of stolen property. Sidney being responsible for arranging other millers to grind the corn.
At the Sessions on Thursday July 1st 1847 Hardy and Goward were found guilty and sentenced to 7 years transportation. No charges were brought against Christmas Robert Sidney. George Self was indicted for receiving four coombs of wheat but no evidence was offered against him; and he was acquitted.
On Wednesday 4th September, Hardy and Goward were transferred from Norwich Castle to the Millbank Receiving Prison, London, in pursuance of their sentence.

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On Monday 22nd November 1847 Charlotte Goward of St. Martin At Oak was charged of stealing 24 yards of print, the property of Mr. Snowdon of St. George's bridge Street.
Constable Vincent had passed the shop and heard her accused of the robbery and he saw the print lying at her feet. Mr. Snowdon would not prosecute and she was discharged.

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First supplied by S&P during the year commencing November 1848.

Became the FANCIERS ARMS by 1865, possibly when the lease was taken on by Bullards.



House no. 357 on 1845 Magistrates list